Blog

Our Move to New Offices

“Thirty minutes until system shut-down” was the announcement over the loudspeaker that signaled the start of the move to new office space.

Read On

Modeling as a framework for knowledge synthesis.

Read On

You WILL Innovate!

Few among us would think highly of a leader who directed us to innovate on demand. After all, innovation is something that comes from a mysterious creative force that strikes like lightning to the fortunate inventor, bringing with it fame and fortune. Think Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard; Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak; Bill Gates; Mark Zuckerberg; or Tim Berners-Lee (huh?) [1].

Read On

Disambiguation

I first came across the word “disambiguation” at a weekend workshop called Ontology in Science. (There is so much that’s just wrong about what I just admitted, but never mind.) I like this word a lot because it makes people ask, “for goodness sake, what are you talking about?” But disambiguation is a serious word, especially in science. It means “to remove ambiguity.” Once you learn that there is a word for getting rid of ambiguity, you begin to realize how much ambiguity there is in the world, especially when people communicate. And it seems to me that the smarter the people and the more complex the topic, the more disambiguation is necessary.

Read On

Living Tongues

Languages, even seldom-used languages, can tell us a great deal about how a group of people categorize the natural and mental world, says Jeff Good, a linguistics professor at the State University of New York at Buffalo (1). Languages are rich in the history and taxonomy of a place, reflecting subtleties that can be lost in translation, says Greg Anderson, an ethnographer who directs Oregon’s Living Tongues Institute (2). When the last keepers of a language die off, so does the fluent understanding of that particular environment.

Read On

Intelligent Wondering 8211 Investigative Clinical Pharmacology

Reviews of new drug applications by regulatory authorities worldwide grow ever more rigorous. I think that one reason for this heightened scrutiny is that reviewers have, over the last 10 years, read many submissions containing results of pharmacometric modeling and simulation analyses. With the use of modeling, explorations of the determinants of drug efficacy and safety are more thorough, and the analyses provide solid support for dose recommendations and labeling content. In short, I think that model-based analyses have raised reviewers’ expectations.

Read On

Inventors and innovation

Elmer Sperry (1860-1930) is remembered as the father of cybernetic (feedback control) engineering. He was the author of more than 350 patents in a wide range of fields, and he developed gyro-controlled steering and fire control systems used on Allied warships during World War I and World War II. He was among the first of the independent inventors of the early 20th century to be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (1).

Read On

Astronomy picture of the day.

During the time that I was a clinical pharmacology fellow with Lewis Sheiner and Stuart Beal in San Francisco, the Voyager mission [1] was sending back incredible images of the moons of Jupiter and the rings of Saturn.

Read On

Intro to Pharma of the Future?

Why is it so hard to incorporate modeling and simulation into drug development? Why do these powerful tools so often fail to provide satisfactory outcomes?

Read On

Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History

In Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History podcasts, the past is twisted and turned upside down in novel and intriguing ways. Dan Carlin, a veteran journalist and radio talk show host, emphasizes the drama of past events and personalities to reveal why history matters today.

Read On