Blog

Run Record for Model Development

The EMA and FDA recommend including a run record in your technical report to describe any major decisions and should include an overview of the steps taken during model development. KIWI 1.3, available in May 2015, will reduce the time taken to perform this task to just minutes.

Read On

How Jazz Hastened Civil Rights

Jazz had a largely unappreciated role in hastening the arrival of the civil rights movement, according to veteran jazz writer Nat Hentoff. As early as the 1920s, white and black jazz musicians played together in after-hours jam sessions. But it was not until the 1940s, Hentoff said in the January 15, 2009, issue of the Wall Street Journal, that jazz musicians and their audiences mixed publicly in clubs—tentatively at first, but then freely and openly, in violation of local laws and mores. As jazz captured more and more avid listeners, white Americans started to understand the effect of segregation in all aspects of American culture.

Read On

Innovation at the intersection of creativity and automation

Chapter 3 of 3. Need to catch up? Read the previous post in this series about scientific workflows.

In the same way that the guillotine concentrates the senses, the need to improve productivity in the pharmaceutical industry has become a life-or-death imperative. Improving productivity does not mean working harder and faster while doing the same job as before. Improving productivity lies in innovation—in the technology and processes that clever minds bring into existence. Moreover, what this innovation must accomplish is vividly clear. We must reduce the time and cost of drug development; increase the probability of successful experiments; and bring better drugs to the marketplace.

Read On

Not too complicated for words.

Jackson Pollock’s Autumn Rhythm (seen here) is an example of a complex painting that can be grasped with a few moments of contemplation, according to Terry Teachout (links to a dead page) in the Wall Street Journal. Pollock worked during the mid 20th century, when nature was assumed to be random. However, as Robert Taylor (links to content that is no longer available) explained in a 2002 Scientific American article:

Read On

David Foster Wallace

I have become addicted to David Foster Wallace’s nonfiction essays, several of which were published in A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again.*

Read On

Rethinking Scientific Workflows

Developing a disease drug model is an intensely creative and collaborative effort. It requires the ability to assemble available knowledge and data and to gain a collective appreciation of important relationships. As this collaborative synthesis gets underway, pharmacometricians are charged with translating the ideas and hypotheses about diseases biology and drug pharmacology into mathematical equations. The equations are then coded into the control streams that, along with the data, become the basis for investigating the feasibility of various hypotheses.

Read On

14 million invisible Americans.

Chana Joffe-Walt,* a reporter for the National Public Radio (NPR) program Planet Money, recently did a fantastic job of investigating one of the most under-appreciated stories of the economic recovery.

Read On

Why don’t computer systems help me as much as I think they should?

Answer: We don’t really understand the requirements of the process.

Chapter 2 of 3. Need to catch up? Read the previous post in this series about scientific workflows.

Read On

Shanghai: A Cacophony of People

Update: For another perspective on tech employment in the United States and China, see Andy Grove’s recent article in Bloomberg Businessweek.

Read On

Celebrating Globalization

The word “globalization” can be interpreted many ways, both positive and negative. In these uncertain economic times, many people think globalization is equivalent to job loss and trade protectionism.

Read On