Blog

Celebrating Globalization

The word “globalization” can be interpreted many ways, both positive and negative. In these uncertain economic times, many people think globalization is equivalent to job loss and trade protectionism.

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Progressive Reporting and Model Based Drug Development

Over the years, our relationships with clients have deepened and Cognigen is often asked to begin working on projects at the earliest stages of development and to continue to refine a model as new data arrives from ongoing clinical development programs. Consequently, if a assets continues to show promise, we have the opportunity to provide modeling and simulation results at decision-making milestones over the lifecycle of clinical development. Typically, these activities culminate in a comprehensive synthesis of exposure-response relationships for efficacy and safety endpoints that are included in the regulatory submission.

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Things to worry about

Here is computer scientist David Gelernter’s [1] answer to the annual question “2013 : What *Should* We Be Worried About?” at the website Edge [2].

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Scientific workflows – the knowledge-generating engines of R&D.

Scientific research requires two kinds of effort. One is the generation and synthesis of original ideas by skilled practitioners. This is a desirable and often lauded talent that can spawn remarkable innovations in science and medical care. The second kind of effort is less visible, but equally important—the hard work required to turn an idea into reality. Executing the experiments, analyzing the data, and developing presentations of results are examples of this work. Although these latter efforts are necessary, and even enjoyable, they nonetheless can be tedious, time-consuming, and expensive.

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Robots

Take a look at BigDog and his amazing robot pals in this link to the New York Times. Or, if you love cute and cuddly, you should check out Paro.

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Ted on Ted

I recently stumbled on a website called TED: Ideas worth spreading, and I apologize in advance for sharing this most addicting site with you.

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The Value of a Conceptual Schema

This year represents the 60th anniversary of the publication of the famous paper by James Watson and Francis Crick proposing a structure for DNA. This podcast from Nature contains interviews with scientists who were actively involved in the race to work out the structure. Listen to the podcast. At approximately 7 minutes into the podcast, there is a remarkable description of Watson’s first look at the classic x-ray crystallography picture of DNA. Watson knew immediately what the picture represented because Crick had, two years previously, published a theoretical paper about what a helical diffraction pattern
would look like.

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I don’t understand why you don’t agree with me.

A New York Times* online essay by Gary Gutting, a philosophy professor, contains one of the clearest explanations of the differences between inductive and deductive reasoning I have seen.

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Productivity is not a four letter word.

For me, anyway, the point of opinion writing is less to try to shape events, a presumptuous and foolhardy ambition at best, than to help stimulate debate and, from my particular perspective, try to explain why things got the way they are and what they might mean and where they might lead. My own idiosyncratic bent as a writer, no doubt a legacy of my years spent in the theater, is to look for a narrative in the many competing dramas unfolding on the national stage.

Frank Rich, New York Times

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World (Cup) Cultures

One of the true pleasures of my job is the opportunity to travel and meet people from all over the world. Different cultures presume different business and social behaviors, of course.* But I have found that in spite of the differences, there are at least two similarities among world cultures: a passion to cheer for your national team to win the World Cup and a nearly universal reviling of the vuvuzelas.

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